Robert A. Teegarden's Blog

August 22, 2012

California’s Proposition 32—The Common Sense Proposition

Filed under: American,Civics,Elections,Government — by Robert @ 8:52 am
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Voting in America, in California, is the fundamental franchise for all citizens.  Being able to vote in an election is that one privilege that crosses all boundaries, all social-economic and age groups.  Whether you are a female, male, young or old, rich or poor, regardless of your background, occupation or nationality, as long as you are a legal citizen you can vote.  You should vote.

Voting allows the individual citizen the opportunity to have their voice heard.  No other government seeks to hear the voice of the citizen in a like manner.  Vote.  This the government of the people, by the people, and for the people.  Notice it doesn’t say government of the business, by the union and for the corporation.  People are the heart and soul of government in America. Period.

The California Constitution says the following about voting:

ARTICLE 2  VOTING, INITIATIVE AND REFERENDUM, AND RECAL

SECTION 1.  All political power is inherent in the people.  Government is instituted for their protection, security, and benefit, and they have the right to alter or reform it when the public good may require.

SEC. 2.  A United States citizen 18 years of age and resident in this State may vote.

SEC. 2.5.  A voter who casts a vote in an election in accordance with the laws of this State shall have that vote counted.

It’s so very simple.   Who votes?  People.  Whose voice is heard in elections? The people’s.  Whose voice is counted in an election?  The people’s.  Notice that the Constitution says nothing about organizations, unions, or groups being able to vote.  Only individual citizens have the right to vote.  It’s their voice that is to be heard and no one else’s.

Unfortunately we’ve allowed groups to influence that process over time.  While they don’t directly vote, these organizations and groups have undue influence in the voting process.   Proposition 32 wants to return the process to normalcy.  Proposition 32 wants to return the franchise of voting to the people, not outside influences.  This only makes simple sense.  If people are the ones doing the voting, then it is only the people whom should be heard.

Proposition 32 simplifies the process:

▪       Proposition 32 bans corporate and union contributions to state and local candidates.  Only bona fide citizens can make those contributions.  It’s their voice that will be heard from the voting booth.

▪       Proposition 32 bans contributions by government contractors to the politicians who control contracts awarded to them.  This is patently common sense.  The way it stands now, businesses that win contracts from politicians for whatever reason are able to give back contributions to those very same politicians.  That’s absurd.  That’s taking government money (your money) and giving it back to the politician through an intermediary (the contractor). That’s hidden graft.

▪       Proposition 32 bans automatic deductions by corporations, unions, and government of employees’ wages to be used for politics.  If an individual citizen which to contribute to a campaign or a candidate, let them do so.  Don’t force it.  Don’t force the taking of one’s salary in exchange for the privilege of working there.  That’s a form of bribery.  Allow citizens to choose their causes and choose their candidates. After all, it’s the citizen who is going to vote and no one else.

Here’s some interesting facts about the current status of the Proposition 32 campaign: d

Those in favor of Proposition 32 (who contributed at least $50,000).

Donor Amount
Thomas M. Siebel $500,000
Charles Munger, Jr. $357,169
Edward Bloomfield, Jr. $300,000
Larry T. Smith $260,000
Jerry Perenchio $250,000
Citizen Power Campaign $225,000
William Oberndorf $150,000
Protect Prop 13 (HJTA) $125,000
Lincoln Club of Orange County $110,000
Frank E. Baxter $100,000
Timothy C. Draper $100,000
William L. Edwards $100,000
B. Wayne Hughes $100,000
Howard F. Ahmanson $50,000
Charles B. Johnson $50,000
Franklin P. Johnson, Jr. $50,000
Nicoletta Holdings Company $50,000
Robert J. Oster $50,000
Richard J. Riordan $50,000

Those against Proposition 32 (who contributed at least $50,000).

Donor Amount
California Teachers Association $8,185,700
California Professional Firefighters $2,100,000
California State Council of Service Employees $2,037,500
AFL-CIO/Working Families $1,300,000
Peace Officers Research Association of California PAC $965,000
California School Employees Association $550,000
SEIU $502,762
California Faculty Association $500,000
Thomas Steyer $500,000
AFSCME $450,000
California Federation of Teachers $300,000
Los Angeles Police Protective League’s Public Safety First PAC $250,000
United State Pipe Trades Council $250,000
International Association of Firefighters $200,000
Professional Engineers in California Government $125,000
California Statewide Law Enforcement Association $100,000
San Bernardino County Safety Employees’ Benefit Association $100,000
John Perez Ballot Measure Committee $100,000
State Building and Construction Trades Council of California $100,000
United Domestic Workers of America $100,000
California State Legislative Board $50,000
United Food & Commercial Workers $50,000

Notice the difference?

Those favoring Proposition (and who contributed more than $50,000)—those favoring giving citizens back their franchise–were people, were citizens.  Four of the 19 were fraternal organizations.

19 of the 21 against the proposition are unions or their PACs.  Get the picture?

So, it’s pretty much a common sense proposition.  Do you want to vote for corporate, and union graft and influence in your government?  Or do you want a government that speaks for the people?  Guess what… you get to choose… at least for now.

August 20, 2012

What Makes Him do the Things He Does?

Filed under: Civics,Elections,Government,Obama — by Robert @ 4:29 pm
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Wyatt Earp: What makes a man like Ringo, Doc? What makes him do the things he does?

Doc Holliday: A man like Ringo has got a great big hole, right in the middle of him. He can never kill enough, or steal enough, or inflict enough pain to ever fill it.

Wyatt Earp: What does he need?

Doc Holliday: Revenge.

Wyatt Earp: For what?

Doc Holliday: Bein’ born.

August 13, 2012

The Ten Commandments of a Poor President

Filed under: Civics,Elections,Good Administration,Government,Obama — by Robert @ 9:14 am
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The Ten Commandments of a Poor President

  1. Refuse citizens, media, cabinet members a share in the decision-making process.  Don’t let them know how you got “there.”  Use pithy remarks and slogans to hide your real agenda.
  2. Issue edicts undergirt only by one’s own presumptive authority.  Make sure these are issued in the dead of night or at the worst, late on a Friday afternoon.
  3. Suddenly change fundamental stated objectives in the midstream of your administration.  In the vernacular, this is called practicing “bait and switch,” say one thing, but do another—consistently.
  4. Permit political pressures and threats of self-serving individuals and groups to alter the practices that have been proven time and again to meet the needs and desires of the total community. Practice and promote political-correctness. Refuse to go beyond party-politics to find the “truth.”
  5. Allow the changing world to change yourself, your philosophy and your convictions such that you cease to exemplify the attributes that characterized you when first discovered.
  6. Initiate, implement through edit transforming innovation without any preliminary testing and approval through pilot programs.
  7. Place all blame for failure upon colleagues, other government agencies, predecessors and the people-at-large and demand full credit, personally, for all obvious successes.  Use an ad hominem wherever possible.
  8. In all modes of outside communication express a sense of possessiveness concerning “my” cabinet, “my” administration, “my” policies, “my people”, “my” programs, “my” ideas.
  9. Exhibit personal qualities not consistent with the behavior and character of a well-educated, roundly developed person—qualifies such as selfishness, greed, mendacity, dishonesty, intolerance, and immorality.
  10. Separate yourself entirely from  all government programs and operate only through edict and paper communication from a cloistered office.

 

Ten Commandments of a Good President

  1. Express in every word and action a high degree of integrity, honor, professional competence, thoughtfulness, intelligence, and balanced judgment.
  2. Involve all appropriate parties in policy-formation activities without surrendering  or overstepping the decision-making responsibilities that must be assumed by all involved.
  3. Develop within the country a clear and accepted understanding of the philosophies and practices which have been adopted as institutional foundations.
  4. By thought and action reveal yourself as a knowledgeable proponent and disciple of a rational governance philosophy.
  5. Be a leader and teacher par excellence with everyone you meet.
  6. Build a staff of individuals offering a varied and comprehensive array of outstanding abilities, prepared and able to press vigorously toward the attainment of designated goals.
  7. Be extremely generous with praise for others when efforts are successful, and quick to accept managerial responsibility when progress is less than admirable.
  8. Spend a large portion of your time outside the enclaves of one’s office, meeting citizens in un-planned and un-rehearsed opportunities.
  9. Exhibit courage and firm leadership when important principles are attacked, even when such defense imperils one’s own personal welfare.
  10. Be a faithful energizer of the people’s policies.

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