Robert A. Teegarden's Blog

December 15, 2012

Evil Came to Connecticut and Into Our World

Evil came to Connecticut and our world yesterday.  Evil and violence killed more than 20 children.  I pray to God for those kids and for their families.  The grief we all feel surpasses the joys associated with this season.  Evil came to Connecticut and to our world.

As tragic as this situation was, as absolutely unfathomable the pain and suffering that comes with the loss of a child, as gut-wrenching our concerns may be, we all need to stop.  We need to mourn, individually and collectively.  We need to account for this loss.  We need to pray to God, however you believe imageshim to be or not.  But this is surely not the time for politics.

But some of our leaders have made it so.

When one consoles another, one comments on the loss, on the evil apparent in the world today, on the tragic shock to all of us—but especially to the parents, and on our prayers of support for the hell through which these families are passing. We offer support and love.

One doesn’t then add that “we’ve all suffered too many of these tragedies,” then list that history and then add, “We need to take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this regardless of the politics.”

My God, how brazen is this person. Nothing is sacred to him. Not even the lives and deaths of children. Evil came into our world yesterday.

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August 13, 2012

The Ten Commandments of a Poor President

Filed under: Civics,Elections,Good Administration,Government,Obama — by Robert @ 9:14 am
Tags: , ,

The Ten Commandments of a Poor President

  1. Refuse citizens, media, cabinet members a share in the decision-making process.  Don’t let them know how you got “there.”  Use pithy remarks and slogans to hide your real agenda.
  2. Issue edicts undergirt only by one’s own presumptive authority.  Make sure these are issued in the dead of night or at the worst, late on a Friday afternoon.
  3. Suddenly change fundamental stated objectives in the midstream of your administration.  In the vernacular, this is called practicing “bait and switch,” say one thing, but do another—consistently.
  4. Permit political pressures and threats of self-serving individuals and groups to alter the practices that have been proven time and again to meet the needs and desires of the total community. Practice and promote political-correctness. Refuse to go beyond party-politics to find the “truth.”
  5. Allow the changing world to change yourself, your philosophy and your convictions such that you cease to exemplify the attributes that characterized you when first discovered.
  6. Initiate, implement through edit transforming innovation without any preliminary testing and approval through pilot programs.
  7. Place all blame for failure upon colleagues, other government agencies, predecessors and the people-at-large and demand full credit, personally, for all obvious successes.  Use an ad hominem wherever possible.
  8. In all modes of outside communication express a sense of possessiveness concerning “my” cabinet, “my” administration, “my” policies, “my people”, “my” programs, “my” ideas.
  9. Exhibit personal qualities not consistent with the behavior and character of a well-educated, roundly developed person—qualifies such as selfishness, greed, mendacity, dishonesty, intolerance, and immorality.
  10. Separate yourself entirely from  all government programs and operate only through edict and paper communication from a cloistered office.

 

Ten Commandments of a Good President

  1. Express in every word and action a high degree of integrity, honor, professional competence, thoughtfulness, intelligence, and balanced judgment.
  2. Involve all appropriate parties in policy-formation activities without surrendering  or overstepping the decision-making responsibilities that must be assumed by all involved.
  3. Develop within the country a clear and accepted understanding of the philosophies and practices which have been adopted as institutional foundations.
  4. By thought and action reveal yourself as a knowledgeable proponent and disciple of a rational governance philosophy.
  5. Be a leader and teacher par excellence with everyone you meet.
  6. Build a staff of individuals offering a varied and comprehensive array of outstanding abilities, prepared and able to press vigorously toward the attainment of designated goals.
  7. Be extremely generous with praise for others when efforts are successful, and quick to accept managerial responsibility when progress is less than admirable.
  8. Spend a large portion of your time outside the enclaves of one’s office, meeting citizens in un-planned and un-rehearsed opportunities.
  9. Exhibit courage and firm leadership when important principles are attacked, even when such defense imperils one’s own personal welfare.
  10. Be a faithful energizer of the people’s policies.

July 17, 2012

Guess Who?

The following are quotes from a variety of sources, mostly biographical in nature.

He was an extraordinary man.

The answer lies within his booming personality.

He was extroverted and charismatic using words to convince people to follow him.

He was quite intellectual in that he excelled in school and became a person of great power.

Many highly regarded California politicians, including Governor Jerry Brown, listened to him.

Because of his determination it appears that he was quite conscientious in his endeavors.

He preached the importance of radical egalitarianism.

He was the patriarch of a dysfunctional family.

His mother supported the family.

As an adult, He wanted to make the world a better place.

He was a charismatic man who demanded loyalty.

His vision was socialist in nature. He believed that American capitalism caused an unhealthy balance in the world, where the rich had too much money and the poor worked hard to receive too little.

He preached activism.

His work was praised in newspapers and by local politicians.

People trusted him and believed that he had a clear view of what needed to be changed in the United States.

From the outside he looked like an amazing success. Yet on the inside, his following was transforming into a cult centered around him.

He quickly became infatuated with power.

He had been deeply influenced by his perception of black religious leader.

He was seen by followers as a prophet and miracle worker.

Equally strong in him were the Marxist leanings underlying his social idealism.

Though a lengthy report was issued, the mass of materials, including the files of the various government investigations of him, have never been made public, and the truth of what actually occurred remains shrouded in mystery.

He was a voracious reader as a child and studied Joseph Stalin, Karl Marx, Mahatma Gandhi and Adolf Hitler, carefully noting each of their strengths and weaknesses.

He personally walked the neighborhood comforting African Americans.

He was careful not to portray himself as a communist in a foreign territory, and spoke of a communal lifestyle rather than of Castro or Marx.

“If you’re born in capitalist America, racist America, fascist America, then you’re born in sin. But if you’re born in socialism, you’re not born in sin.

Unlike most other figures deemed as cult leaders, he was able to gain public support and contact with prominent local and national United States politicians.

He forged media alliances with key columnists.

He grew up very much an exile of society, and had an understanding of the troubles minorities faced in not being accepted.

With such an understanding of how these people had suffered, the ordeals that they had been through and the pain within them, it is no surprise that he was so able to gain their trust and make them feel like he was really ready to help them.

He appeared to be a great person, and he convinced so many people that he was doing great things in the community.

He was a political animal – very ego-driven and very successful.

Such a moving statement allows us to empathise and understand why this man, who is seen as a villain today, was so widely respected and immortalised. He provided them with so much which ultimately led to unimaginable loyalty and trust to this man, such as a child honours that of a sporting hero.

The people were betrayed by the actions of their hero, their role model but they cannot be blamed for entrusting such faith in him, as he misled them to believe him to be a demigod, perfect in so many ways and what he said. What he told them to do was truly thought to be the right thing to do.

You could even say they were oblivious that it was their own hard work and determination which brought about the better lifestyles; they believed it was this organization.

He was a very desirable man to many women, and a role model to the men.

He was a man who understood the troubles of minorities and just generally of others, always ready to empathise with others. If you put your trust and faith in him, you were rewarded and looked after.

His intentions may have begun as good, yet one thing is for sure; one man should not have such power over anyone, especially not such a mass of people.
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Of whom do we speak?

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Jim Jones of Jonestown, Guyana

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Sound familiar?

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Don’t drink the Kool-Aid!

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